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About Us

The South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) is a voluntary association of institutions established by the national cabinet of the South African Government to build consensus across government, civil society and all other stakeholders to drive an enhanced country response to the scourges of HIV, TB and STIs. The Council is not a juristic person. Under the direction of SANAC, the government of South Africa created the South African National AIDS Council Trust as the legal entity that is charged with achieving its aims. The SANAC Secretariat exists to implement the objects of the SANAC Trust established in terms of the Trust Property Control Act.
The main objectives of the Council are to:

  • foster dialogue between government, civil society and all other stakeholders and to oversee the country's response to HIV, TB and STIs;
  • advise government on HIV and AIDS, TB and STI policy and strategy and related matters;
  • strengthen the governance, leadership and management of the response to HIV, TB and STIs at national, provincial, district and local levels;
  • strengthen the multi-sectoral response to HIV, TB and STIs as a contribution to the overall social and economic development of South Africa, including but not limited to policy review, programme management and co-ordination, technical assistance and capacity building and sectoral support;
  • mobilise resources domestically and internationally to finance the response to HIV, TB and STIs, including but not limited to estimating expenditure and resource needs, fund-raising from domestic and international institutions, including Treasury, donor co-ordination and investigating new sources of funding for the multi-sectoral response and the NSP;
  • ensure the monitoring of progress against the targets set in the NSP and ensure mid and end of term evaluations for the prevailing NSP;
  • create and strengthen partnerships for an expanded national response in South Africa to HIV, TB and STI among government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), donors of funds, agencies of the United Nations, the South African private sector and people living with HIV, TB and STIs.

South Africa has a generalised HIV epidemic, which has stabilised over the last four years at a national antenatal prevalence of around 30%. In 2009, an estimated 17.9% of the adult population was living with HIV. This is estimated to be 5.63 million people, including 3.3 million women and 334 000 children.
HIV infection fuels the tuberculosis epidemic, with more than 70% of patients co-infected with both infections. The highest prevalence of TB infection is among people aged 30-39 years who are living in townships and informal settlements.
South Africa currently ranks the third highest in the world in terms of the TB burden, with an incidence that has increased by 400% over the past 15 years. There is a wide variation in HIV and TB prevalence across age, race, gender, socio-economic status and geographical location. It is estimated that 80% of the South African population is infected with the TB bacillus. However, not everyone who is infected will progress to active TB disease. Certain populations are at higher risk of TB infection and re-infection. These include health care workers, miners, prisoners, prison officers and household contacts of confirmed TB patients. In addition, certain groups are particularly vulnerable to progressing from TB infection to TB disease. These include children, people living with HIV, diabetics, smokers, alcohol and substance users, people who are malnourished or have silicosis, mobile, migrant and refugee populations and people living and working in poorly ventilated environments. These groups are considered "key populations" for TB.
The TB infection rate places South Africa as the third country with the highest level of TB in the world after India and China. South Africa recorded 970 new infections per 100, 000 people in 2009. The number grew to 981 people newly-infected with TB out of every 100 000 in 2010 and 993 new infections per 100 000 in 2011.
Whilst STIs such as syphilis have decreased in most provinces over the past 10 years, the prevalence of herpes simplex, which is a co-factor in the acquisition for HIV, is still high in many sectors of the population.

FAQ

What does SANAC stand for?

The acronym SANAC is short for South African National AIDS Council. This is a body that brings together government, civil society and the private sector under one umbrella to construct a controlled and co-ordinated response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. This inclusiveness is illustrated in the leadership of SANAC which is led by the country’s deputy president, Kgalema Motlanthe and Mmapaseka “Steve” Letsike, a member of civil society who is the deputy chairperson of SANAC. Although SANAC was formed to respond to the AIDS challenge, its mandate expands to cover TB and STIs, which are closely linked to HIV and AIDS.

Where do I find SANAC?

SANAC is currently based at the offices of the national Department of Health at the corner of Thabo Sehume and Andries streets, in Pretoria. The Council has close ties with the Department mainly because of the nature of its work, which is health related.

Who funds SANAC?

Work around HIV and AIDS and TB requires a lot of funding. SANAC’s primary source of funding comes from government, through the national Department of Health. Other funding comes from international donors. We then channel these funds to specific programmes aimed at addressing HIV and AIDS, TB & STIs in the country.

What kind of work does SANAC do?

SANAC has a broad range of objectives which include, but are not restricted, to the following… to foster dialogue between government, civil society and all other stakeholders and to oversee the country’s response to HIV, TB and STIs; to advise government on HIV and AIDS, TB and STI policy and strategy and related matters; to mobilise resources domestically and internationally to finance the response to HIV, TB and STIs, including but not limited to estimating expenditure and resource needs; and to ensure the monitoring of progress against the targets set in the NSP.

Where can I learn more about HIV and AIDS, TB & STIs?

A number of websites offer information about these conditions. Visit the national Department of Health’s website www.health.gov.za for more info. We would also recommend that you visit www.aidsportal. You can also use the SANAC website for specific information which you might find in our Resources page.

OUR GOAL

The vision of the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) is a long-term one. It is to ensure a healthy life for all South Africans. Our vision is underpinned by the commitment to ZERO new HIV and TB infections, ZERO preventable HIV and TB deaths and ZERO HIV and TB discrimination. We are a long way from ZERO on all three of these fronts.

Through the rollout of the National Strategic Plan (NSP) for HIV and AIDS, TB and STIs (2012 – 2016), SANAC has the duty to support and to promote the following goals of the NSP:

  • Reduce new HIV infection by, at least, 50% using a combination of available and new prevention methods.
  • Ensure that 80% of all people who need anti-retroviral treatment (ART) actually do get it, ensure that 70% of these people do recover and remain alive and continue taking treatment five years after initiation of ART.
  • Reduce the number of new TB infections and deaths caused by TB by half (50%).
  • Ensure an enabling and accessible legal frame-work that protects and promotes human rights in order to support the implementation of the NSP.
  • Reduce self-reported stigma related to HIV and TB by 50%.